Wild Trails with Brad Meiklejohn

What is it like to be an avalanche specialist? A conservationist? A wilderness traveler? A Buddhist? Brad Meiklejohn is a long-time Alaskan who has written a new book titled The Wild Trails that explores these topics and more. On this show Brad discusses the challenges and rewards of helping others and the natural world, including his work on restoring the Eklutna watershed by removing an old dam by working with the Eklutna People and others. His insights on recreation, conservation, and self-growth are based on his work as an avalanche forecaster and educator, co-founder of the American Packrafting Association, his role as the Alaska State Director of the Conservation Fund, and his many significant trips to the Arctic and other wild places.  

HOST: Paul Twardock

GUEST:

  • Brad Meiklejohn

LINKS:

The Wild Trails:  Brad Meiklejohn:  Bradmeiklejohn@aol.com  (email Brad to get a copy)

Rewilding.org and The Wild Trails excerpts: https://rewilding.org/how-to-be-a-conservationist/ https://rewilding.org/we-lied-to-you

The Conservation Fund

Face of this place

American Packraft Association

Eklutna Dam Removal

BROADCAST: Thursday, August 18th, 2022. 10:00 am – 11:00 a.m. AKT

REPEAT BROADCAST:  Thursday, August 18th, 2022. 8:00 – 9:00 p.m. AKT

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Eric Bork, or you can just call him “Bork” because everybody else does, is the FM Operations Manager for KSKA-FM. He oversees the day-to-day operations of the FM broadcast. He produces and edits episodes of Outdoor Explorer, the Alaska-focused outdoors program. He also maintains the web posts for that show. You may have heard him filling in for Morning Edition or hosting All Things Considered and can still find him operating the soundboard for any of the live broadcast programs.

After escaping the Detroit area when he was 18, Bork made it up to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where he earned a degree in Communications/Radio Broadcasting from Northern Michigan University. He spent time managing the college radio station, working for the local NPR affiliate, and then in top 40 radio in Michigan before coming to Alaska to work his first few summers. After then moving to Chicago, it only took five years to convince him to move back to Alaska in 2010. When not involved in great radio programming he’s probably riding a bicycle, thinking about riding bicycles, dreaming about bikes, reading a book, or planning the next place he’ll travel to. Only two continents left to conquer!

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