Alaska’s summer heatwave

Some kids try to beat the heat by selling cold drinks and lounging in a pool on the side walk in downtown Petersburg, Aug. 7. (Photo courtesy of Bennett Mcgrath)

From the 90 degree July 4th in Anchorage to low sea ice in the Chukchi sea to drought in Southeast- this summer has been one for the record books. How has that heat affected marine mammal, fish and seabird populations? And what does the hot weather mean for the state as Alaskans adapt to the reality of climate change? We’ll discuss the summer heat wave on the next Talk of Alaska.

HOST: Annie Feidt
GUESTS:

  • John See, Anchorage Fire Department Forester
  • Rick Thoman, Alaska Climate Specialist, International Arctic Research Center

PARTICIPATE:

Call 550-8422 (Anchorage) or 1-800-478-8255 (statewide) during the live broadcast

Send an email to talk@alaskapublic.org (comments may be read on air)

Post your comment before, during or after the live broadcast (comments may be read on air).

LIVE Broadcast: Tuesday, Aug.20, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. on APRN stations statewide.
SUBSCRIBE: Get Talk of Alaska updates automatically by email, RSS or podcast.

Annie Feidt is the Managing Editor for Alaska's Energy Desk, a collaboration between Alaska Public Media in Anchorage, KTOO Public Media in Juneau and KUCB in Unalaska. Her reporting has taken her searching for polar bears on the Chukchi Sea ice, out to remote checkpoints on the Iditarod Trail, and up on the Eklutna Glacier with scientists studying its retreat. Her stories have been heard nationally on NPR and Marketplace.
Annie’s career in radio journalism began in 1998 at Minnesota Public Radio, where she produced the regional edition of All Things Considered. She moved to Anchorage in 2004 with her husband, intending to stay in the 49th state just a few years. She has no plans to leave anytime soon.
afeidt (at) alaskapublic (dot) org  |  907.550.8443 | About Annie

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